Doodle. Your happiness depends on it.

By | December 11th, 2013 | 1 Comment
U-Doodle mural

The chalky aftermath of a recent U-Doodle meetup.

Just as your Art Basel hangover begins to fade, you’re facing another art-stuffed weekend. Saturday is Art Walk in Wynwood, which may be too much to handle for anyone still tasting Krylon after last week’s burst of street art opportunism. Luckily, there’s an alternative to the N.W. Second Avenue circus. Read the rest of this entry »


What happened to Beached Miami?

By | September 30th, 2013 | No Comments
Miami Art Walk: "Feathers"

We set out to “squeeze the orange dry” but Miami’s far too juicy for that. — photo by Robby Campbell

You may have a fair question: “What happened? You guys used to post 50+ times a month and now it’s once in a blue moon. What gives?”

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Brain Circulation and Miami’s future as a Start-Up City

By | February 10th, 2013 | 8 Comments
Richard Florida

Organized by influential urbanist and author Richard Florida (pictured), Start-Up City: Miami will feature talks by Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh and AOL co-founder Steve Case on Wednesday, Feb. 13. — photo by Jaime Hogge

The narrative of Miami’s ongoing transformation comprises various story lines, including, most prominently, the burgeoning of its artist community and cultural offerings (as chronicled in the recently released documentary Rising Tide). There’s also the less prominent stories of its increasingly vibrant music scene — attested to by our list of the Top 50 South Florida Songs of 2012 — and its surprisingly rich bike culture (surprising because our sprawled-out, car-centric city would seem utterly inhospitable to bike travel — and, in fact, it can be.)

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East meets West in the Gutter Film Series’ August program

By | August 6th, 2012 | No Comments
Black Belt Jones

The Karate/Blaxploitation film Black Belt Jones leads off the Gutter Films Series’ August screenings.

Most would agree on the enduring value of watching classic films — Casablanca, Citizen Kane, etc. — but film buff Joey Halegua makes a fascinating point about the merit of the unacclaimed films in the history of cinema. “I think it is just as important for people to see the unpopular films of the past,” he says. “Approaching films in this way allows you to form a more realistic and well-rounded understanding of the media/culture of a particular time.”

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